Thunder Review

Reviewed on 13 Mar 2015
  • Event review

    This was my first time seeing Thunder. Having heard of the incredible live performances from their tour 2 years ago with Journey &  Whitesnake, together with highly talked about festival performances, I was buzzing to experiencing British rock legends..


    The band emerged from the studio last year with a brand new album and announced a long-awaited show at the Barclaycard Arena. They delivered a mixture of new songs with their classics from over the years.

    But firstly, let’s talk about Reef. Reef we’re huge in the 90s, and still managed to draw a massive crowd and amaze the audience. The band soon played hits ‘Place Your Hands’ and ‘Naked’ which send me together with the rest of the crowd jumping and singing around… Also I have to mention lead singer Gary Stringer has now grown one of the most impressive beards, maybe one of the most impressive beards to ever to grace the Barclaycard Arena stage, looking like a member of ZZ Top! Let’s hope to see Reef in the arena again soon!

    Then it came time for Thunder… the band have been around for over 25 years and they know how hold the arena. Danny Bowes is a man who owns the stage; with his powerful voice easily reaches the back of the packed out arena with rest the band effortlessly playing through their incredible set list.

    It was a typical rock gig, with the stage filled with amps and included an impressive light display throughout the gig. Even though it was a smaller set up in the arena than usual, the band filled it with ease and brought a show that is worthy of any stage.

    They started the night with new songs off their new album, which had a great reception but it was the classics ‘Love Walked In’ and ‘Dirty Love’( played in the encore) which has the crowd going. The crowd participated all night, singing and jumping to every Thunder song.

    Verdict

    Thunder were truly impressive and I’m sure it won’t be long before they return to an even bigger audience!


    Reviewed by   Martin Clarke